daffodils

daffodils

The cool autumn temperatures make it the perfect time to plant fall bulbs for spring color. By planning ahead now, you can design a long-lasting, brightly colored spring in your yard. The amazing transformation of the homely lump you drop in a hole to the rainbow of blooms in spring is nothing short of a miracle. From cheery daffodils, elegant tulip cups, to lush hyacinths, you can create a spectacular show planted en-masse or in containers. You can even ‘force’ some bulbs to bloom indoors.

Fall bulbs need a period of cold before they can grow. When this dormant period is followed by warming temperatures in springtime, the bulbs spring into action. Each variety conveys its own color and charm, filling the air with cheery vibrant hues.Evergreen Nursery has a wide range of bulbs in stock now.

Planting and Growing Tips

bulb foodBefore you plant your bulbs, we recommend placing them in a paper bag in your refrigerator for a couple weeks. Make sure you don’t put apples in the fridge, as the gasses released by apples kill bulbs. Before planting, enrich the soil by working in GreenAll Soil Booster. Some varieties of bulbs require deeper planting depths than others, but a good rule of thumb is to plant your bulbs 2-3 times deeper than the bulb is tall. If you are planting individual bulbs, a bulb planter is a helpful tool that makes this chore much easier than using a spade.

Mix 1-2 tablespoons of E.B. Stone Organics Bulb Food into the bottom of the hole. If you are planting a large area, spread 2 cups of Bulb Food evenly over 25 square feet and blend it into the soil to a depth of about 8 inches. Water well after planting but avoid having your bulbs soaked constantly. Over watering or poor soil drainage can rot bulbs. Most bulbs will benefit from a layer of mulch on top of the soil. Mulch helps regulate soil temperature and will maintain a good moisture level. Feed again after flowering and when new growth begins next year. After blooming, allow the green leaves to yellow before pulling the leaves off, which allows nutrients to go back into the bulb.

 

Blooming Times

crocus

crocus

If you have the space, it’s fun to plant different varieties of bulbs for a longer season of color. Because different flowers bloom at different times, you can keep your yard looking bright and colorful all spring long.

 

bulb planting guidePetite crocuses are the first bloomers, coming in late February and March. Daffodils herald spring with their happy, trumpet-shaped blooms shining brightly throughout March and April. Later bloomers, such as tulips and hyacinth, will round out your spring nicely to make sure you have color all spring long. With a little planning, you can create an outstanding display of spring-flowering bulbs from February to June. If you are short on space but want to enjoy a spring bulb arrangement, try planting up a container. You can layer different bulbs for a long-lasting show.

 

Sparaxis

Sparaxis

Our Favorites
We like all bulbs, but if you are interested in trying something new, we can help you choose a selection that will be perfect for your garden. For tall, high drama and great cut flowers, Dutch Iris, with their intense colors, can’t be beat. Peonies are show stoppers that bloom late Spring and Summer and are great for the middle of a sunny bed. Delicate ranunculus, with their charming crepe-papery petals, bloom mid-season and gorgeous massed in planters.

Ranunculus

Ranunculus

If you’re looking for something a little more exotic, try Sparaxis. Also known as harlequin flower, this African relative of the iris does especially well in our Bay Area climate. Boasting colorful, poppy-like blossoms, Anemone are fun mid-season blooms. For summer drama, plant elegant white Calla Lillies and Pink Amaryllis Belladonna (Naked Ladies), which pair beautifully with Agapanthas. Bulbs good for ‘forcing’ are Hyacinths, Paperwhites, and Amaryllis. Look for our special kits of Amaryllis, which make excellent gifts.
Come visit us today and get planting!